The Late 1940s Black and White TV of Virtual Reality Experiences

Everyone seems to be chasing some pretty lofty production goals in VR right now – fully immersive 360 cinematic visual experiences, with full body tracking and gestural input – and that’s great. It’s like the ultimate mind bending experience. But it’s missing a bigger, more achievable, and more deliverable alternative which is a lot more like black and white TV of the late 40s.

It’s not a sexy as the hard wired, high octane, dedicated immersive pipeline experience of an 8K surround, best seat in the house concert experience, or the subtly expressive and captivating world of an elegantly rendered narrative, but it’s deliverable, right now, and on cardboard or a simple smartphone.

If we let go of designing for the future hardware utopia – no not all of us, and certainly not all of the time – we can make experiences that we can deliver right now. How captivating they are will be based on how well the inherent limitations are embraced and become part of the experiences themselves. It’s like the $9.95 sculpture in design class – what’s the best sculpture you can make for $9.95? Not what’s the best approximation of $9,999 dollar sculpture you could have made if the assignment weren’t so damn frustrating, and not the $0.99 sculpture – you get no points for false economies. But the best that you can do while fully embracing the limitation of $9.99.

What can we do with limited resolution, limited bandwidth, limited tracking, limited capture? Can we make a simple experience that can be immersive, but not stereo? Can a viewer go to a web page, hold up their smart phone and be inside an engaging experience? What are the experiences that lend themselves most to these design constraints? News? Documentary? Sports? Conversations? Simple telepresence? Standup comedy? Variety shows? We are not at the readily available 8k video experience of VR yet; we aren’t even at the readily available Color TV NTSC 1950s experience of VR yet. How do we design compelling experiences for what we do have. There were compelling things on TV when it was black and white, on a tiny round screen, and the image was mostly ghosted, solarized, and smeared. Maybe people were just smarter in the 40s.

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scottsingercg

Over 20 years of experience in creative/technical supervision and design in Visual Effects, Feature Animation and Scientific Visualization.

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