AR It’s All an Add

I’ve seen a lot of very hyped “visualizations” of what new next generation AR experiences will be like over the next few years, and one thing none of them are covering is how they’re dealing with the compositing of the augmented content with the reality content.  In a mixed reality mode, it’s pretty straight forward because the entire image is synthetic and the new content is simply comped “over” a live feed from a device camera. But with augmented content, light field, OLED, etc, the augmented content is  reflected, refracted or projected over the background, essentially compositing the new content as an add – and so effectively it exists like a reflection on a window.

Which is great – it’s a very useful and impressive thing, but it’s not generally what’s shown in the product marketing collateral. To their credit Epson shows the simulated images for their Moverio glasses as being somewhat transparent, and maybe because they are used to dealing more directly with imaging professionals. So what does this disconnect between the promise and the delivery mean? Well it might be that no one really notices – they may be so blown away by seeing aliens attack their living room that they don’t care that their floor lamps are visible through the enemy hordes. However, they might just as easily be left feeling that they’ve just watched an early B monster movie. Will the take away from the AR revolution, be that it’s nothing more than just tech hype, over promised and under delivered?

What troubles me here is that it would be very easy for the marketing videos to be pretty darned accurate to the actual display characteristics of the devices – just composite the elements on the video feed as an Add rather than an Over and you’d be very close (+- some error in trying to match luminosity, etc). But they don’t. They display it as though it’s an opaque element – and well … that does look better, it’s more realistic and ultimately presents a far more compelling experience. And the decision to present it inaccurately probably means they know how much better it looks. So they must be a bit worried about showing the reality of what’s really, currently available.  And if they’re worried I’m worried.

Composting in real time AR/MR experiences actually offers some really cool development opportunities – let’s hope people start taking those on soon.

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Published by

scottsingercg

Over 20 years of experience in creative/technical supervision and design in Visual Effects, Feature Animation and Scientific Visualization.

One thought on “AR It’s All an Add”

  1. I assume that some of these devices will use a combination of an LCD layer to control the screen’s opacity and LED to add the rendered colors. If not: hey VR device industry, free idea for you!

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