Who will make the merchandise display cases for VR shopping?

Many are convinced that simultaneous, shared, social experiences in VR and other 3D immersive modalities are a foregone conclusion. Regardless of how deluded we might be in this, one thing becomes clear – in order for this to scale, we will need to have a consistent way of describing all of the stuff – much like how molecules are a consistent way of describing the real world. Luckily the virtual world is many orders of magnitude simpler than the actual physical world, and instead of the uncountable trillions of sub particle level interactions of matter, the virtual world needs only a truly astounding level of trackable events through a potentially manageable number of protocols and standards.

The problem is that even at many orders of magnitude simpler, the task of how to consistently describe “anything” so that we can share it, sell it, buy it, travel to it, hold it, toss it back and forth, etc. is still really, amazingly complicated. Much more complicated than say – the choice of game engine d’jour, OBJ or FBX or Collada, or whether or not you have a cool physics engine. But what really are the basics of virtual matter that need description so that they can be manipulated in the ways we expect? I was thinking about this and came up with a functional, if prosaic example to get me into a more pragmatic frame of mind than say – blasting space zombie outlaws.

Let’s assume we have simultaneous social immersive 3D experiences delivered over a common framework. And let’s say that within that space there are millions of stores. And in many of these stores is the virtual equivalent of a merchandise display case. And let’s say your company makes display cases for virtual environments. There are a lot of assumptions here for sure, and the “display case” here is really just a conceptual placeholder for whatever the virtual world might offer up as a kind of “durable good”. But let’s put all that aside for the moment and assume that your business is making virtual display cabinets.

In the real world, display cabinets have certain features that make them more suited for some purposes than others, and yours are very good and specialized. In your case they are jewelry cases that have buttons on top that let a shopper rotate the shelves around forward and back. You make high end cabinets that are very durable and come in standard sizes that fit in with other leading retail fixture manufacturers’ products. The doors operate smoothly allowing ample access for the sales associate to quickly retrieve even the most tiny items the customer might want. When a business orders cabinets from you, they pay for them, you ship them out, they are installed and exist physically in place. No one can really duplicate them beyond manufacturing a knock off product.

In a virtual world retail businesses will want display cabinets, and just like in the real world they won’t normally want to design and manufacture them themselves. They will expect to buy them and for them to just simply work. Customers will be able to easily peruse their options and make their choices. They may want to try things on, see how they match the color of their eyes before they buy them. Your display cases will have to use the same “trying on” mechanisms that the rest of the display cases in the store do, because the store will want to support the latest most accurate shopping reality capture avatar system available. Your display case needs to be installable within the store’s inventory control scheme, but also installable within the stores local cartesian coordinate frame. It needs to be addressable within their asset management system so that stock changes and merchandising decisions can be pushed to the cabinets from central databases. Your cabinets will need to be backward compatible with this stores stock and inventory system which is several versions out of date because “they like their system fine the way it is”, and they are a big customer so you need to keep their business.

And so let’s say now you’ve managed to make a a future proof, universally accessible and addressable, fully inter-functional display cabinet, backward compatible with old virtual mercantile standards, with compliant e-commerce security features, but you still have another issue. How do you make sure that the store isn’t making copies of your display cabinets and using them across all their wholly owned subsidiaries? Or selling them overseas to offset a flat Christmas sales season? Or being stolen by a nefarious shopper and resold on the lucrative display cabinet black market?

This is where it’s all about standards. All about the protocols that set out the expected behaviors and configurations that define and prescribe how all of these magical virtual interactions happen. It’s the subatomic glue that connects all the disparate experiences into coherent, navigable places, and continues to do so after the cowboys and star fighters have all gone home.

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Published by

scottsingercg

Over 20 years of experience in creative/technical supervision and design in Visual Effects, Feature Animation and Scientific Visualization.

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